“Poptimism is a studied reaction to the musical past. It is, to paraphrase a summary offered by Kelefa Sanneh some years ago in The New York Times in an article on the perils of “rockism”: disco, not punk; pop, not rock; synthesizers, not guitars; the music video, not the live show. It is to privilege the deliriously artificial over the artificially genuine. It developed as an ideology to counteract rockism, the stance held by the sort of critic who, in Sanneh’s words, whines “about a pop landscape dominated by big-budget spectacles and high-concept photo shoots” and reminisces “about a time when the charts were packed with people who had something to say, and meant it, even if that time never actually existed.””
— Saul Austerlitz on The Pernicious Rise of Poptimism

A single word is “clean, simple and bold — especially if you find a really splashy one,” says McKee. “I have a book of titles that I’ve compiled over the years, and I do find that one-word titles are special, probably because it means a simple hook and an even simpler concept. I know that when I do stumble upon a one-worder that pops, I’m psyched. If one word can sum it up, then the bones of the song are sturdy.”

(via 'Roar' 'Royals' 'Happy': Why So Many Hits Now Have One-Word Titles | Billboard)

BOK BOK featuring KELELA - Melba’s Call (by Night Slugs)

"Blue Note records are designed simply to serve the uncompromising expression of hot jazz and swing, in general. Any particular style of playing which represents an authentic way of musical feeling is genuine expression. By virtue of its significance in place, time and circumstance, it possesses its own tradition, artistic standards and audience that keeps it alive. Hot jazz, therefore, is expression and communication, a musical and social manifestation, and Blue Note Records are concerned with identifying its impulse, not its sensational and commercial adornments."

(via The Record Label That Saved Jazz - Esquire)