nprfreshair:

Human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson represents those who have been abandoned. His clients are people on death row — abused and neglected children who were prosecuted as adults and placed in adult prisons where they were beaten and sexually abused, and mentally disabled people whose illnesses helped land them in prison where their special needs were unmet.
Today he spoke to us about justice in the 21st century:

"The new statistic from the Justice [Department] is really disheartening: The Justice Department is now reporting that one in three black male babies born in the 21st century is expected to go to jail or prison. The statistic for Latino boys is one in six. That statistic was not true in the 20th century. It was not true in the 19th century. It didn’t become true until the 21st century. That means we have enormous work to do to improve our commitment to society that is not haunted and undermined and corrupted by our legacy of racial inequality.”

One Lawyer’s Fight For Young Blacks And ‘Just Mercy’

Photo: Linda Nylind, The Guardian nprfreshair:

Human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson represents those who have been abandoned. His clients are people on death row — abused and neglected children who were prosecuted as adults and placed in adult prisons where they were beaten and sexually abused, and mentally disabled people whose illnesses helped land them in prison where their special needs were unmet.
Today he spoke to us about justice in the 21st century:

"The new statistic from the Justice [Department] is really disheartening: The Justice Department is now reporting that one in three black male babies born in the 21st century is expected to go to jail or prison. The statistic for Latino boys is one in six. That statistic was not true in the 20th century. It was not true in the 19th century. It didn’t become true until the 21st century. That means we have enormous work to do to improve our commitment to society that is not haunted and undermined and corrupted by our legacy of racial inequality.”

One Lawyer’s Fight For Young Blacks And ‘Just Mercy’

Photo: Linda Nylind, The Guardian

nprfreshair:

Human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson represents those who have been abandoned. His clients are people on death row — abused and neglected children who were prosecuted as adults and placed in adult prisons where they were beaten and sexually abused, and mentally disabled people whose illnesses helped land them in prison where their special needs were unmet.

Today he spoke to us about justice in the 21st century:

"The new statistic from the Justice [Department] is really disheartening: The Justice Department is now reporting that one in three black male babies born in the 21st century is expected to go to jail or prison. The statistic for Latino boys is one in six. That statistic was not true in the 20th century. It was not true in the 19th century. It didn’t become true until the 21st century. That means we have enormous work to do to improve our commitment to society that is not haunted and undermined and corrupted by our legacy of racial inequality.”

One Lawyer’s Fight For Young Blacks And ‘Just Mercy’

Photo: Linda Nylind, The Guardian

I did go to school for Marine Biology, but the cool thing is… the greatest thing for me is that Polynesians, our gods, Kahoali, Maui, all these water gods, so it’s really cool and a honor to be playing a [water] character. And there’s not too many brown superheroes, so I’m really looking forward to representing the Polynesians, the natives.

My family are some of the greatest water men on earth. I’m not, but I’m going to go train with them. But it’s really an honor just being a Polynesian. And water is the most important thing in this world and we all know it. It’s cool be a part of DC’s universe.

— Jason Momoa on getting to play Aquaman (via racialicious)

(via racialicious)

itscolossal:

Installed earlier this month in the Bahamas, “Ocean Atlas" by Jason deCaires Taylor depicts a young Bahamian girl carrying the weight of the seas. It is the largest sculpture ever deployed underwater and is built from special concrete that promotes the growth of coral and marine life in an attempt to draw diving tourists away from more sensitive areas nearby.


Seeing this in person would trip me out. itscolossal:

Installed earlier this month in the Bahamas, “Ocean Atlas" by Jason deCaires Taylor depicts a young Bahamian girl carrying the weight of the seas. It is the largest sculpture ever deployed underwater and is built from special concrete that promotes the growth of coral and marine life in an attempt to draw diving tourists away from more sensitive areas nearby.


Seeing this in person would trip me out. itscolossal:

Installed earlier this month in the Bahamas, “Ocean Atlas" by Jason deCaires Taylor depicts a young Bahamian girl carrying the weight of the seas. It is the largest sculpture ever deployed underwater and is built from special concrete that promotes the growth of coral and marine life in an attempt to draw diving tourists away from more sensitive areas nearby.


Seeing this in person would trip me out. itscolossal:

Installed earlier this month in the Bahamas, “Ocean Atlas" by Jason deCaires Taylor depicts a young Bahamian girl carrying the weight of the seas. It is the largest sculpture ever deployed underwater and is built from special concrete that promotes the growth of coral and marine life in an attempt to draw diving tourists away from more sensitive areas nearby.


Seeing this in person would trip me out.

itscolossal:

Installed earlier this month in the Bahamas, “Ocean Atlas" by Jason deCaires Taylor depicts a young Bahamian girl carrying the weight of the seas. It is the largest sculpture ever deployed underwater and is built from special concrete that promotes the growth of coral and marine life in an attempt to draw diving tourists away from more sensitive areas nearby.

Seeing this in person would trip me out.

(via comix)

Alice Smith - She (2014)

Going to see her live (again) in a couple weeks.

(via blackgirlsarefromthefuture)

Commercially, she hit the jackpot with “Together Again,” a joyous tribute to friends she had lost to AIDS over the years that became the highest-selling single of her career. At the time, I couldn’t fathom that this upbeat dance track (with its perfectly choreographed video) was about grief and death. It just made me want to dance. That is where she excelled. Janetʼs ability to effortlessly present necessary, meaningful messages via classic dance music is legendary. She proved that artists donʼt have to scream to get a message across. There is a middle ground. Here, she had perfected her mix of provocative, personal, and pertinent. The only other human who could discuss racism, self-love, misery, despair and the like while murdering some 8-counts was Michael. It had to be genetic.

(via The Revisit: Janet Jackson’s ‘The Velvet Rope’)

"To me, AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted, that’s the best. I woke up one day and that record was a phenomenon that you couldn’t get away from. It’s better than Straight Outta Compton, because that was a shock record. AmeriKKKa’s had more good songs than Compton did.

Puffy once told me that he studied AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted before doing Biggie’s first album, and to me that’s a major statement. It shows that AmeriKKKa’s was the blueprint for how records were put together for a long time after that, with the skits and the whole record being one thing. It all sounds like it was made on the same day. It set the tone for a lot of records to come, for probably 10 years after that.”

—Ice Cube

(via The Making of Ice Cube’s “AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted”)

Your politics ought to be a groovier thing
Vote Dizzy! Vote Dizzy!
So get a good president who’s willing to swing
Vote Dizzy! Vote Dizzy!

Dizzy Gillespie for President, 1964.